water_treatment

What’s Wrong With The Ocean City Water?

Are There Contaminants In your Ocean City Water?

When was the last time you considered contaminants in your Ocean City water supply? Does the failure of the water supply systems in recent news have you rethinking your home’s water in Ocean City?

Ocean City Water
It was determined that the Ocean City water supply is not susceptible to contaminants originating at the surface due to the protected nature of the confined aquifers. The water supply is susceptible to naturally occurring iron in the aquifers, chlorides due to saltwater intrusion, and trihalomethanes and haloacetic acids, which are disinfection by-products. Source: Ocean City Annual Water Quality Report, 2015.

Regulated vs. Unregulated Contaminants

The town’s most recently published annual water quality report is complete for 2015. It shows that all regulated Ocean City water contaminants are within the acceptable range for “potable” water. The report gives the thumbs up to the safety of the town’s drinking water. Yet many homeowners don’t realize there’s more to understanding the quality of Ocean City drinking water than a cursory review of the regulated contaminants.

The Ocean City Water System is comprised of wells, treatment plants and storage tanks. All parts of the system are regularly monitored and tested. The regulated contaminants (such as Chlorine, Nitrate, Barium) are within the required range for safety. However, there are levels of other unregulated contaminants that may be cause for concern. Chlorate, Chromium and Strontium, unregulated contaminants, are within the acceptable range for safe water, but score on the high end of the acceptable range. The town’s high level of Chlorine in the water is also worth noting.

Are Unregulated Contaminants In My Water A Concern?

Trace levels of the three contaminants described below are not immediate health risks. Although, long-term exposure and levels on the high end of the scale for safe water are under investigation for long-term health effects. Installing an in-home water treatment system will improve the health and taste of your water.

Chlorate is a relatively toxic, sodium salt. Chlorite and chlorate are disinfection by-products resulting from the use of chlorine dioxide as a disinfectant and for odor/taste control in water. Unfortunately, once it has been formed in drinking water, chlorate cannot be removed.

Chromium is a prevalent natural element and has been monitored to gather information for future regulation. Chromium-6 can cause cancer, reproductive problems and liver damage even from little exposure.* Chromium can be removed with a home water treatment system. Look for approval from the WQA (Water Quality Association) and a quality product like the Hague WaterMax®.

Strontium is a naturally found alkaline earth metal. Exposure to high levels of strontium during infancy and childhood can affect bone growth and cause dental changes. There is some evidence that strontium increases bone density in adults, as well. The isotope strontium-90 has been linked to bone cancers and leukemia.* While there are no systems specifically designed for Strontium removal, most home water treatment systems remove alkaline earth metals.

Ocean City Water Contaminants

Iron Concerns

Iron levels in drinking water have also been a recent concern and changes in the treatment process were adjusted. The annual water quality report for Ocean City shows that raw water iron concentration trends haven’t increased significantly in recent years. The city claims existing iron removal treatment processes are expected to regulate levels for the foreseeable future.

Older pipes may also be a source of high iron levels in your home’s water. If you are concerned about iron levels, then home water treatment systems like a Chemical Free Iron filter from Hague Quality Water of Maryland can help.

Contact Hague Quality Water of Maryland about contaminants in your Ocean City Water. We’ll demonstrate how to see, taste and feel the difference of treated water.

* Source: Drink-Tap.org